Diabetes

Kerri

Tag your bag for the journey: Medical bag tags

Share Button

If you’re an avid traveler, you know the importance of keeping tags on your luggage. One trip, I could not for the life of me find a luggage tag in my house! Fortunately my suitcase made it successfully through both flights, but I can’t say I wasn’t just a tiny bit nervous because it seemed like I was tempting fate! But, how well do you identify your medical items as yours?
 

medical bag with red ID tag

Certain items, like blood glucose test kits, zip cases for medications, oxygen tanks or compressor bags and CPAP machines, wheelchairs or walkers, or nebulizer compressors are important, especially when travelling. Any bags that contain medical supplies should be readily identified so that if they are lost, the urgency to return them and their contents is known. Our red medical ID key chains also double as excellent bag tags. I have one attached to my nebulizer bag—if someone finds it somewhere and does not know what it is, they will at least know that it is medical equipment, and hopefully take it somewhere where they will find a way to contact me and return my supplies! 
 
Most of us are very careful with our medical equipment—but, especially in the hustle and bustle of travel, things happen. By outfitting your equipment or medication bag with a medical tag, such as our bright red ones, you can have the peace of mind that anybody who finds your bag can get it back to you. A tag can also help people identify where to find the medication that you might need if you cannot get to it yourself. Our tags come in both plastic and aluminum versions, as well as a red-emblem stainless steel version. While all of our products are light, I have the plastic red tag on my nebulizer bag—it’s low profile and stays out of my way, but is bright enough to see when needed. Since this small carry bag for my neb stays within my carry-on bag most of the time, I don’t test the tag’s durability too much; however, if you are really rough on your bag (like I am on my backpack!) you may prefer the aluminum version for your journeys.
 
And, unlike those those paper-insert plastic tags that sometimes only last one trip on your suitcase before the plastic cracks, these sturdy little tags will hold up to whatever you throw at them, just like the rest of our products. 
Kerri

Tips for Halloween Safety

Share Button

jack-o-lantern-pumpkins-11288879970iUJPIt’s coming up to Halloween time, and that means trick-or-treaters will be storming the streets. Here are some quick tips from My Identity Doctor to help you and your kids have a safe and healthy halloween.
  • Be bright. Glow sticks, reflective tape, and flashlights added to costumes can help kids be more visible. Wear bright coloured costumes to help out—while they might not be as scary, not much is scarier than a car coming at you unexpectedly!
  • If pets are walking around with you, they may be easily startled, and should also have something bright attached to them to stay safe.
  • Stay outside. Remind kids never to go inside a stranger’s house on Halloween night.
  • Check candy. Remind kids never to eat candy before they get home. If they really can’t resist, send some safe candy from home with them for their adventure.
  • Read labels. If your child has food allergies, ensure you read all candy labels or contact manufacturers. Have safe candy at home for them to have a treat while you’re checking their candy.
  • Be mindful of medical needs. If your kids have medical conditions, ensure you’re prepared for anything that might arise when you’re out—such as high or low blood sugars for kids with diabetes, seizure disorders, fatigue, or asthma (bonfires or exertion might cause symptoms). For kids with autism or other sensory issues, having another parent or adult along—whether collecting candy individually or in a group—might help to keep your child safe in a time that might be full of sensory overload. Another adult can help you keep an eye on the child with autism, or allow you to take an overwhelmed child home and allow others in the group to keep going with supervision.
And of course, our Medical ID products from My Identity Doctor compliment any costume—mix your fun with safety for a lower-stress night out.
Jon

Useful Tips : Diabetes Medical Bracelets for Children

Share Button

Kids medical braceletThe reason we have ID bracelets for diabetes sufferers is that the medical professionals can readily and quickly identify key information about the condition of a patient in the event of an accident. Read More…

Jon

Diabetic and Gluten-Free Recipes for Holiday Season

Share Button

This holiday season, you would like to find the right recipes for you or your family and friends. When you or someone else is diabetic or has a gluten intolerance, getting your hands on the right recipe can help immensely. A good recipe can make sure that the medical ID jewelry does not have to be put to use, thankfully. Everyone can enjoy their meal, coming away stuffed and happy. With so many recipes out there due to the increased attention on diabetic and gluten-free friendly diets, this is an easy task. Anyone can find delicious, easy to prepare recipes that offer all of the flavor without any of the negative side effects.

Looking at your medical bracelet, or that of a family or friend, you might wonder how you can create the perfect holiday feast Read More…

Jon

World Diabetes Day

Share Button

 

The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) announced that there are 382 million people around the world diagnosed with diabetes. In the UK alone, there are 3 million people suffering from diabetes. The number of people with diabetes will increase through the years, and will be a heavy burden to health systems worldwide, including NHS UK. IDF estimates that globally, there are millions more who are not aware that they have diabetes. In the UK alone, about 850,000 people are diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes. This represents an alarming increase of about 132,000 people from last year’s numbers with 90% having Type 2 diabetes. Read More…

1 2  Scroll to top