Sleep Apnea

Kerri

National Stop Snoring Week: A nuisance or a health problem?

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In March, we celebrated Sleep Awareness Month on our My Identity Doctor United States blog, and the importance of sleep on our health. Now that we have reached the last week of April, it’s National Stop Snoring Week here in the UK! Often, we see (or hear!) snoring as just another nuisance—after all, it is irritating when your partner or hotel roommate is a snorer, isn’t it? However, snoring can be a sign of other medical issues—or, nothing at all—so it is important to get checked out!
I have two stories of people in my life who have seen a doctor about snoring, and each hpillows-1031079_640ad different results—this is why snoring is nothing to brush off, however, also nothing to lose sleep over! (Okay, bad pun!)
A couple years ago, a friend was at a tournament sharing a room with other athletes and his coach. The coach was also a doctor, and he told my friend that during the night it had sounded as if his breathing was stopping, and that he should see someone to get evaluated. My friend had a sleep study done, and it was determined that his snoring and breathing issues were caused by sleep apnea. For about two years now, he has used a CPAP machine at night, and no longer has scary attacks when he wakes up after not breathing. A bonus to this? He also does not snore anymore—I was surprised as well, just how very quiet his CPAP machine is! It is even quieter than a central heating or cooling system kicking in!
Several years ago, someone I know finally went to the doctor about her snoring after years. She was referred to an Ear Nose and Throat specialist (ENT), who after a quick physical examination of her throat, simply informed her that she has an enlarged uvula (which hangs down from the top of the “soft palate” in the mouth—if you reach your tongue back you may be able to feel your soft palate!). This is not in itself dangerous, but it means that her airway becomes narrower during sleep causing snoring. The doctor said that there was no guarantee surgery would help, and sent her on her way—simple as that!
Other causes of snoring include sinus issues which may be easily treated with nasal sprays, or even simply your sleeping position, in which case your doctor may recommend a mouth guard of sorts or a jaw strap to keep your jaw better aligned to prevent snoring. So, snoring may not always be a sign of something sinister, which means it is important to get things checked out! If you have sleep apnea or another sleep disorder, medical ID jewelry can be important—but in all cases, it is important to get snoring checked out, for peace of mind and a better night sleep!
Kerri

Tag your bag for the journey: Medical bag tags

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If you’re an avid traveler, you know the importance of keeping tags on your luggage. One trip, I could not for the life of me find a luggage tag in my house! Fortunately my suitcase made it successfully through both flights, but I can’t say I wasn’t just a tiny bit nervous because it seemed like I was tempting fate! But, how well do you identify your medical items as yours?
 

medical bag with red ID tag

Certain items, like blood glucose test kits, zip cases for medications, oxygen tanks or compressor bags and CPAP machines, wheelchairs or walkers, or nebulizer compressors are important, especially when travelling. Any bags that contain medical supplies should be readily identified so that if they are lost, the urgency to return them and their contents is known. Our red medical ID key chains also double as excellent bag tags. I have one attached to my nebulizer bag—if someone finds it somewhere and does not know what it is, they will at least know that it is medical equipment, and hopefully take it somewhere where they will find a way to contact me and return my supplies! 
 
Most of us are very careful with our medical equipment—but, especially in the hustle and bustle of travel, things happen. By outfitting your equipment or medication bag with a medical tag, such as our bright red ones, you can have the peace of mind that anybody who finds your bag can get it back to you. A tag can also help people identify where to find the medication that you might need if you cannot get to it yourself. Our tags come in both plastic and aluminum versions, as well as a red-emblem stainless steel version. While all of our products are light, I have the plastic red tag on my nebulizer bag—it’s low profile and stays out of my way, but is bright enough to see when needed. Since this small carry bag for my neb stays within my carry-on bag most of the time, I don’t test the tag’s durability too much; however, if you are really rough on your bag (like I am on my backpack!) you may prefer the aluminum version for your journeys.
 
And, unlike those those paper-insert plastic tags that sometimes only last one trip on your suitcase before the plastic cracks, these sturdy little tags will hold up to whatever you throw at them, just like the rest of our products. 
Jon

Why Sleep Apnea Patients Needs Medical Bracelets

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sleep-apnea-braceletPatients that suffer the night condition of Sleep Apnea may be less aware they have the condition than their partners do. Obstructive Sleep Apnea is when airflow stops and becomes blocked during sleep. Fortunately, in most cases the brain will alert your body to its sudden lack of oxygen and wake you up or cause your body to snore or snort loudly to open up this air channel. As any partner will testify, the sudden snorting and snoring sound that precedes ten frightening and worrying seconds following a short period when the other partner stops breathing can be terrifying.

However, many of us sleep alone and how would you know if you have sleep apnea? In the worst cases a medical bracelet is highly recommended and may even be demanded by your doctor, because you never know one day it may save your life. Read More…

Jon

How To Treat Sleep Apnea

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treatments of sleep apneaSleep apnea can be a sort of sleep ailment characterized by stoppages with inhaling and exhaling as well as instances of low as well as irregular inhaling and exhaling while sleeping. Every temporarily stop with inhaling and exhaling, called an apnea, can last minimum 10 seconds many a few minutes, and may come about 5 to 35 times or maybe more an hour. Read More…

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