food allergy awareness month uk

Jon

Food Allergy Awareness Month

Share Button

Peanut allergyOne of the most common reasons people will wear a medical ID bracelet is for a severe food allergy. Especially for kids, who may have trouble communicating their needs, a food allergy medical bracelet or anaphylaxis alert bracelet can put those around them, especially their parents, at a bit more ease. In the case of the food allergy medical bracelet, the jewelry does not just cause people to react if an emergency takes place, but serves as a visual reminder that a child needs special care—that is, avoidance of their allergen.
In the UK, the most common food allergens are: milk, egg, soy/soya, fish/seafood, peanut/legume and tree nut, sesame (and other seeds), mustard, and wheat. [1] People may be allergic to more than one item on the list, and those who have asthma may experience more severe reactions. Severe allergic reactions may also develop to anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction to a substance. Symptoms of anaphylaxis include breathing problems, rash, throat swelling, hives, gastrointestinal symptoms (vomiting), and swelling. Treatment of anaphylaxis must be rapid, given as an injection of epinephrine, typically in an autoinjector. Epinephrine will halt and begin to reverse the reaction, but dosing may need to be repeated. Once epinephrine is given for a suspected reaction—one should ALWAYS err to administer as it will do little harm to give epinephrine without need, but could do great harm to delay dosing—999 should be called immediately and the person should always seek emergency care from the hospital. Some people will have a second dose of epinephrine with them, to be given 10 to 15 minutes following the first dose, in the event the reaction begins to come back.
Because of the rapid need for treatment of allergic reactions, severe allergy medical ID or anaphylaxis ID bracelets should be engraved with ALLERGIC TO [food item], GIVE EPINEPHRINE – CALL 999, then followed by an emergency contact number to ensure that the person is promptly administered epinephrine if they are unable to administer themselves. It may also be helpful to engrave where epinephrine is stored (such as a backpack or purse)—most schools recommend or require children self-carry epinephrine, even if they cannot self-adminiser, and that the epinephrine is worn on the child’s belt in a waist pack for quick access. For your food allergy medical ID needs, please check out our shop!
 Scroll to top