obsessive compulsive disorder

Jon

Mental Health Awareness Week

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Trigger warning: suicide, OCD, depression, anxiety, eating disorders, addiction
 
cube public domainEverybody has a brain, which means everybody can get mental illness. Mental illness is an umbrella term for variations in how the brain functions—anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, eating disorders, and addiction, are all forms of mental illness. Mental health is essentially, by definition, the absence of mental illness – but that does not mean that, with treatment, a person can not have a mental illness and also have good mental health—though it may take more work.
For instance, my friend Mark had obsessive compulsive disorder, a form of mental illness. With a lot of work, he has overcome the challenges of having OCD. Mark maintains that no specific changes will work for every person: a combination including or excluding any of therapy, medication, diet, exercise, journaling, medication, behavioural strategies, and more [1], will work different for each person. Each person’s experience will be different, and it is important to not draw conclusions, make assumptions, and to make unsolicited recommendations to a friend or family member with mental illness.
Mental illness may be unpredictable, both for the person living with it and those around them. Some mental illnesses increase the risk a person will engage in risky, life-threatening, or suicidal behaviour. This is why medical ID jewelry for mental illness is important. If you are in crisis, it is important to seek medical care immediately, but also to be aware that you may not be in the right place emotionally or psychologically to communicate your needs. A medical ID bracelet for mental illness, including eating disorders medical ID, anxiety disorder or depression medical jewelry, or schizophrenia or bipolar medical alert products can help to ensure the people who most need to are aware of your diagnosis, and can help keep you safe.
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